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New York Chiropractic College Logo

New York Chiropractic College

2360 State Rte. 89
Seneca Falls, New York, USA, 13148
Phone: (800) 234-6922
Fax: N/A

New York Chiropractic College Doctor of Chiropractic Program
Chiropractic has become an integral part of healthcare. One of the fastest-growing healthcare professions, chiropractic increasingly finds itself managing patients care through collaborative partnerships with other essential healthcare professionals. In embracing this collaborative role, NYCC is dedicated to educating our students on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disorders of the neuromuscularskeletel system, while exploring the effects of these disorders on the nervous system and on health in general.

Special emphasis given to the treatment of neuromusculoskeletal conditions

Discover the science, art and philosophy of chiropractic

Get one-on-one attention and mentoring from faculty members who are practicing doctors of chiropractic Prepare for a successful career with courses focusing on practice development along with in-depth chiropractic study

Become part of one of the fastest growing, highest-demand healthcare professions U.S. Dept. of Labor predicts that openings for doctors of chiropractic will grow faster than average for health-related occupations, as demand for complementary medicine increases

Benefit from real-world experience with internships in an array of diverse healthcare environments We are helping to advance the chiropractic profession by actively supporting chiropractic research Learn to manage patient care through collaborative partnerships with other traditional and alternative healthcare professional

Duration of the Doctoral Program
The Doctor of Chiropractic (D.C.) degree requires a minimum of ten 15-week trimesters (three years and four months, total) of full-time resident study, including a clinical internship.

This is the equivalent of five academic years Students who need to complete the program over a period longer than the stated minimum may do so under the guidance of the Dean of Chiropractic To be awarded the D.C. degree, it is mandatory that degree requirements be completed within seven calendar years of original matriculation

Average Rating: 3 (9 votes)

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Rating Comments for New York Chiropractic College
5 Ivy League Chiropractic School
by MDchiro
Date posted: (10/19/2011)
My Experience Overall Rating: 5

Overall: 5
Housing: 5
Pass rate for National Boards: 5
Quality and Reputation of Professors: 5
Research Department: 5
Practice Management Skills: 5
Financial Aid Department: 5
Classroom size: 5
Leadership: 5
Techniques: 5
Location: 4
Atmosphere: 5
Philosophy: 4
Cost: 3
The Basic Science & Clinical Science curriculum is phenomenal! I was encouraged to participate in many areas within the college (research, clubs, conferences, and more) and made it a unique experience. Reading other reviews, I'd mention at this point how the clinic experience in my last year was very strong. Many patient encounters without having to actively recruit. Rotations through VA medical centers and community hospitals taught solid integrative medicine. Current clinical faculty are open to many different technique styles and encourage making your technique truly yours (it is an art form after all). There are now philosophy and business courses that are part of the core curriculum that expose students many different viewpoints. I had no problems starting into practice after graduating (5 days to be exact).
Suggestions
NYCC does emphasize a research-influenced model of care. If you're convinced that chiropractic can fix everything and plan on seeing 100 patients a day, then this is NOT the school for you!
Overall Opinion
Fantastic! I passes all boards, first time, little to no preparation beyond coursework. I'm told to have very good technique for a recent graduate. Paperwork and business aspects are second nature after intense requirements from school.

2 Great core curriculum. Clinic needs revamping.
by nycc2012grad
Date posted: (09/17/2012)
My Experience Overall Rating: 2

Overall: 1
Housing: 2
Pass rate for National Boards: 4
Quality and Reputation of Professors: 4
Research Department: 2
Practice Management Skills: 2
Financial Aid Department: 3
Classroom size: 2
Leadership: 1
Techniques: 2
Location: 1
Atmosphere: 1
Philosophy: 1
Cost: 1
Up until my 7th tri, I thought NYCC was the leader among the chiropractic colleges. NYCC offers the best scientific core curriculum anyone could ask for with top notch professors who are extremely knowledgeable and committed to education. These courses more than prepare students to excel on the national board exams. That being said, no chiropractic philosophy is taught at NYCC. I learned more in a 2 hour seminar about how and why chiropractic works than I did in 3 years at NYCC. As an NYCC student, you must take initiative and shadow many chiropractors so you have a better idea of what this profession is all about. Unforunately, everything goes downhill once you enter clinic. There are no standards and students, as well as their clinicans, have no guidance. There are four hub clinics, each run entirely differently with their own set of rules that are constantly changing. Students have NO voice. Complaints have been voiced over and over, and still students are treated like they are in high school. Students are expected to attend more than their scheduled number of hours as part of "clinical experience" (which usually involves sitting on a computer at the hub site). Rotations are valuable, but somehow nobody that works for NYCC can create a fair and equal schedule. Basically, all students do NOT get the same opportunities which leads to a clinical atmosphere with low morale.
Suggestions
Market/advertise for the hub clinics to increase patient volume. Treat students like adults. And listen to them! Make a student guidebook specific to clinic and enforce rules. Penalize students who disobey the rules rather than change the rules altogether and make everybody suffer. Make online classes more student specific instead of forcing all students to do coursework centered around opening their own practice.
Overall Opinion
My overall opinion is that NYCC has the potential to be the best chiropractic college there is, but they need to do some serious revamping of their clinical program and treat students like adults. The school needs to penalize students the first time they disobey the rules and not allow them to continue through the program with their peers who put in an immense amount of effort to become successful. Admitting students should not be based on their ability to provide the school with a check, but rather the student's understanding of chiropractic and passion to help people.

2 Sorry in advance about this rant haha
by adio86
Date posted: (09/14/2012)
My Experience Overall Rating: 2

Overall: 2
Housing: 2
Pass rate for National Boards: 4
Quality and Reputation of Professors: 4
Research Department: 3
Practice Management Skills: 1
Financial Aid Department: 3
Classroom size: 3
Leadership: 1
Techniques: 1
Location: 2
Atmosphere: 2
Philosophy: 1
Cost: 2
At NYCC the basic sciences are quite impressive. It falls apart after that. A diversified adjusting technique with motion palpation is endorsed at the school, and all other techniques are mildly tolerated at best. Much of the faculty does a great job (with the exception of few) at bashing all other forms and techniques of chiropractic with little to no evidence to substantiate their claims. The majority of class time is spent diagnosing diseases and illnesses. None of this time covers how we could help individuals with such illnesses heal with chiropractic. Students may often fail the basic science courses, but not one individual will have to repeat a technique course (as long as they show up). This was scary to witness. Chiropractic philosophy is non-existent within the curriculum. Regular philosophy is passed off as chiropractic philosophy. I realized how little I was actually taught once I started cracking some books and reading it for myself. Soft tissue therapy is emphasized much more than chiropractic adjusting at this school (IMHO). A soft tissue tool called ConnectX that is unique to NYCC is now even being marketed. Students must spend hundreds of dollars (on top of their tuition) if they would like to take the elective to learn how to use ConnectX. Very soon, all other (free) soft tissue tools will be removed from clinic in order to solely promote it. The school does not listen to the students input. Administration runs this school like a high school. From the first day, any concerns addressed by our class president were ignored. For example, the administration at NYCC recently decided to remove a class representative speech at graduation for ‘time’ purposes. The administration decided to create a generic speech and have a lower trimester student present it. Even when multiple class petitions were signed (from different trimesters) and class presidents spoke to administration about other solutions to the ‘time’ concern, all ideas were ignored.
Suggestions
There should be less soft tissue modalities that should be replaced with different forms of adjusting techniques. Administration should be completely replaced. Student concerns should, at the very least, be acknowledged.
Overall Opinion
All in all, 1. if you are looking for a school that will adequately teach you the basic sciences while narrowly directing you in one paradigm of chiropractic and denying that there are any other techniques, this is the school for you. 2. If you are looking for a school that will expose you to chiropractic philosophy and a number of different techniques while appreciating your concerns as a paying student, look elsewhere.

5 Awesome experience
by chirogirly
Date posted: (07/24/2007)
My Experience Overall Rating: 5

Overall: 5
Housing: 4
Pass rate for National Boards: 5
Quality and Reputation of Professors: 5
Research Department: 4
Practice Management Skills: 4
Financial Aid Department: 5
Classroom size: 5
Leadership: 4
Techniques: 5
Location: 4
Atmosphere: 4
Philosophy: 5
Cost: 5
I have been to 5 different schools before deciding to come to nycc. This school is far superior to the others I have seen. Anatomy program is the best out there. Faculty are very qualified. Very friendly, beautiful campus as well as friendly staff. Better value than all other schools. very reasonable cost of living.
Suggestions
Overall Opinion
excellent experience

2 My two cents
by NYchiroGrad
Date posted: (07/18/2006)
My Experience Overall Rating: 2

Overall: 2
Pass rate for National Boards: 5
Quality and Reputation of Professors: 2
Classroom size: 3
Leadership: 1
Techniques: 1
Location: 2
Philosophy: 1
I concur with kenpark's review, and here's my addition... grips and praises: If you're a city person like me, the 2 yrs and 4 months in the middle of nowhere (Seneca Falls) will be a test of your willpower. Civilization (rochester/syracuse/Ithica) is 45 min drive away. The dorm rooms are great, roughly 1200 sq ft for a single, but brownouts are common. To make it bearable, sking/golf/fishing/hunting is fantastic, living off campus near the lake for summer fun (boat/waterski/etc). Cafe is terrible. Cook yourself. The basic sciences are top notch. NYCC prepares you very well for Board exams. I passed all 4 without studying, and I have a 3.1 GPA. I have 3 major issues with the courses. 1) Technique: Motion palpation and any soft tissue technique is endorsed. SOT/Activator/Thompson drop are tolerated. Hostile towards all other techniques & not permitted in clinic. Gonstead/CBP/upper cervicals are avail only in clubs. Very hostile attitude towards all other techniques makes the clubs difficult to survive. 2) Philosophy: Non-existant, not even medical philosphy. Very hostile attitude towards straights. I'm straight, and I was given a tough time by professors and classmates. 3) Business/practice course: A travesty. On-line courses only and it's self-study. Worthless. The student clinic is a mixed bag. Staffed predominately by inexperienced recent grads, it makes learning challenging. But that can be overlooked once you go into the 3 outpatient clinics. Levittown, is the oldest & most well-established clinic. I've finished my graduation requirements in 4 months out of 12. I've also seen & treated cases we learned about that is uncommon/rare. Outreaches are fantastic. No hostile attitude here, you can practice any technique within reason (no xray). Clinicians are top notch. This is the only saving grace for NYCC. Buffalo clinic is 2nd oldest, excellent outreach programs but low pt vol. Seneca Falls clinic is recent, little/no patient volume.
Suggestions
1) Stop with the hostile environment -- that leads to high attrition rate even among tech professors. 2) More different techniques. Especially gonstead. 3) Any philosophy, even medical philosophy. 4) Improve student body. Too many immature students who cheat or rude to fellow professors/students. It feels like highschool. Recent college grads vs 2nd career folks (25-30yr olds) vs old timers (35+). Hostile. 5) Change school president. Good vision but not doing enough to properly execute it. Doesn't do enough to represent the school. Not actively advancing chiropractic, not even mixed. Read The American Chiropractor June 2006 college presidents article. 6) Spread out course load hours more evenly or merge some. We need more hours for clubs. Clubs only meet during M-Thr 12-2, 1 hr allotment. 7) Improve research. With hostile attitude towards technique, there should be more research on technique then. Motion Palp isn't perfect either, yet no effort is made to integrate best of each technique into curriculum or research the best parts.
Overall Opinion
In the end, most things balance out by the time you graduate except for 2 key issues: 1. If you're not assertive in any technique, which half of my class is, you're going to struggle. 90% of my class can't adjust which is unfortunate. Saving grace is that 50% learn soft tissue technique (ART/Nimmo/Graston/etc). 2. Business/practice courses. By nature you'll be forced to attend a chiro business seminar, hire a consultant/management, or be an associate. Opening your own practice after graduation is ill-advised. Not enough tools to allow you to succeed. Bottomline: If you want to become a medi-practor, go to a MD school in US or foreign. We have enough MD wannabe's with hostile anti-chiro attitude at NYCC. Duh, you're in a chiro school, what are you guys doing here?! If you want to become a mixed chiro, I would recommend coming here as long as you go to Levittown clinic. If you want to become a striaght chiro or care on how to adjust patients properly, go to Life instead. Especially now that it has Guy Riekeman at the helm.

4 Great School - but has flaws
by SearchForCure
Date posted: (07/17/2013)
My Experience Overall Rating: 4

Overall: 4
Housing: 1
Pass rate for National Boards: 4
Quality and Reputation of Professors: 5
Research Department: 3
Practice Management Skills: 3
Financial Aid Department: 5
Classroom size: 4
Leadership: 4
Techniques: 4
Location: 3
Atmosphere: 5
Philosophy: 2
Cost: 2
Beautiful school in terms of architecture and landscape. It is located right beside Cayuga lake which makes up for the fact that it is located in the middle of nowhere. They force you to buy sub-par cafeteria food in which if you don't the money is lost. The residence halls are terrible - DO NOT LIVE THERE DURING THE SUMMER. I cannot believe how that havent addressed this issue yet as they forbid A/C in the residences while the entire school is bombed with A/C - absolutely impossible to learn. In terms of overall academics the basic sciences (anatomy, neuroanatomy, physiology, etc...) are all taught by very intelligent professors as we learned essentially the same if not more than most medical schools. In terms of techniques learned - they teach you over hundreds of adjustment techniques which allows you to form your own niche. (I cannot speak from experience but friends who chose CMCC explain how they drill only a limited amount of techniques) In terms of clinic it is very poor. After 2 and 1/3 years you finish with most in class schooling and you are in clinic - where you're basically doing nothing. You are treating maybe 2-3 clients a day in which all the money goes back to the school (while you are paying ,000). During this time it is suggested to start researching what type of business you would like to run (or where you would like to work) as they do not teach enough about business skills (the highest make in our class is no longer a chiropractor as he didn't know how to run a business) If you choose to enter the September trimester - you will not get to know the prof's as well (which can be good or bad based on your preferences). In the January and May trimesters you are more involved in the learning process (for example - in the September trimester each cadaver may be assigned 8-10 people. In the January trimester we were assigned 5 people to our cadaver - making a greater responsibility of dissection on each individual).
Suggestions
Overall Opinion
Heavily researched based. Anything that has not been proven to work (within scientific literature), it is generally not taught.

3 i'll try to be fair
by kenpark
Date posted: (04/15/2006)
My Experience Overall Rating: 3

Overall: 2
Housing: 3
Pass rate for National Boards: 4
Quality and Reputation of Professors: 1
Research Department: 4
Practice Management Skills: 1
Financial Aid Department: 5
Classroom size: 3
Leadership: 1
Techniques: 3
Location: 2
Atmosphere: 2
Philosophy: 1
Cost: 3
NYCC fills you with quite a bit of enthusiasm for what they want you to become in the profession when you arrive. They quickly strip it away. The basic sciences were a good time. they do have some excellent faculty and staff. The chiropractic sciences (technique department) actually has some fantastic teachers in it, but it also has a few that belong in other departments or not in an academic setting at all. Clinic is where the school falls apart. The clinic experience (at least mine and many of my classmates) was by all accounts sub-par. Our outreach clinics on the other hand were fantastic, we had hospital rounds, healthcare settings, and outpatient centers that were the only saving grace of our last year of education. The sad thing is there are many good clinicians there also, but they are often left doing paperwork while lesser clinicians receive the patient load.
Suggestions
Improve clinic experience. Less reactionary and more open minded discussion of history and philosophy (enough viewing chiropractic through the Joseph Keating blinders) More technique department freedom to teach chiropractic instead of boards prep. More diversity in technique.
Overall Opinion
I made many good friends and I had many teachers that I respect and am thankful to have had a chance to learn from. I would advise consideration when looking at this school.

4 Excellent School
by tman7dc
Date posted: (03/24/2006)
My Experience Overall Rating: 4

Overall: 5
Housing: 4
Pass rate for National Boards: 5
Quality and Reputation of Professors: 5
Research Department: 5
Practice Management Skills: 2
Financial Aid Department: 5
Classroom size: 5
Leadership: 5
Techniques: 4
Location: 4
Atmosphere: 5
Philosophy: 3
Cost: 3
NYCC trains its docs to be an important player in the health care community. Stressing diagnosis and knowing when a patient is a chiropractic candidate and when further evaluation is needed is one of the school's strongest points. Also basic sciences are taught by excellent MD, PhD and DC faculty, with excellent technique professors. There is a broad range of philosophy among the professors, so the student gets exposed to many differing viewpoints on chiropractic care. Top notch facilities also.
Suggestions
More time in technique, and more diversity in the techniques they expose students to in the core curriculum. Also NYCC, as I have heard about most chiro schools has very little business training. At the very least a year long exposure to general medicare rules (which tend to be the standard in which other insurance companies follow) would provide the student more readiness to strp into private practice or an associate position with much less training on how to code for services.
Overall Opinion
Excellent school... I felt very well prepared starting my first job!!!!! Would recommend it to anyone interested in becoming DC.

4 Phenominal School! ....itty-bitty living space
by LIChirokid
Date posted: (01/14/2009)
My Experience Overall Rating: 4

Overall: 4
Housing: 4
Pass rate for National Boards: 5
Quality and Reputation of Professors: 5
Research Department: 5
Practice Management Skills: 5
Financial Aid Department: 5
Classroom size: 4
Leadership: 4
Techniques: 3
Location: 3
Atmosphere: 3
Philosophy: 2
Cost: 4
Academically NYCC prepares you to be a great clinician. Basic sciences are top of the line taught by MD/PhDs, DC/PhDs, DCs, PhDs and MDs. People always say that there is little philosophy, but I feel that you can't teach philosophy in a classroom. It's something you acquire by yourself over time. Diagnosis and exam classes are fantastic. Tests in those classes are set up like part 4 boards so by the time part 4 comes around it feels like you've done it 100 times. Clinic was hit and miss. I was in the Levittown clinic which ended up being slow in the clinic because clinicians had retired. The outreaches are great experience and the clinicians let you do whatever therapies you think are best for any particular patient. They also offer great internships: Bethesda Naval Hospital, Miami VA Hospital, Buffalo VA Hospital, etc. I was fortunate to do a 5 month internship at a MD/PT/DC/Acupuncture clinic where I learned from a DC with a neuro diplomate. I even got a chance to observe surgery and MUAs. I gotta say after graduating I feel ready to diagnose and treat any patient who presents to me. The lifestyle in Seneca Falls is a change of pace for most. I'm from Long Island and I'm used to having NYC right there, so I had to make a serious adjustment (no pun intended). The school provides lots of intramurals every trimester, there's a ton of wineries which are more fun than they sound and it seems that there's about 10 guys in every tri who play guitar. It's a great place to start a band because no one is around to complain. The biggest problem with the school in my opinion is the Board of Trustees/President. They never change anything on campus and I get the impression they are hard to work with because there seems to be a high turnover of professors. They also do not allow any post-grad seminars on campus and I think it's because they don't want to give the impression that they promote any technique or ideology.
Suggestions
They need to allow post grad seminars on campus. Let the students get exposure to everything, isn't that the whole point of being an academic institution. I think they need to have healthier food in the cafeteria. I think it's kind of funny how and institution of a profession that pushes good nutrition serves such terrible food. They could use some more business classes, but my feelings with that are the same with philosophy. You're going to learn more about it when you're completely immersed by it rather than by sitting in some lecture.
Overall Opinion
If I had to give NYCC a grade I'd give it a B+. It's not perfect by any means, but I'd have to think it's better than most schools. If you can handle being in Seneca Falls for 2 years than that's the hardest thing you'll have to deal with. The education is great and you will be ready to dive into practice once you graduate. Also with the small community, you will become very close with the faculty and your classmates. I was in a big class and it did get kind of clicky by 3rd tri, but the friends I have are friends I believe I'll keep the rest of my life.

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